A Blot on the Parti Mauricien

The Parti Mauricien has not much to say on politics proper. Its pièce de resistance appears to be mud-slinging

We were eager to know what the Parti Mauricien had to say on the constitutional proposals and the by-election of Port Louis. We are sorely disappointed after its first meeting held last Saturday at Plaine Verte. The Parti Mauricien has not much to say on politics proper. Its pièce de resistance appears to be mud-slinging.

We expected the Parti Mauricien to discuss matters on a higher plane and with less passion. The way the first meeting was carried should make the most brazen-faced blush. Far from adding lustre to the Parti Mauricien, the meeting has stamped an indelible black blot upon it.

It was a meeting held mainly with the purpose of presenting the candidate of the Parti Mauricien, Mr Bhujoharry. In presenting him as one of the most charitable souls on earth, the speakers must have thought that they would win the sympathy of the people. But, in fact, what they said sounded pretty hollow. They raised Mr Bhujoharry to the skies but in doing so they revealed that they wanted to make capital out of what he has been doing perhaps as a good Christain. Religious people very often are seen to be doing a good turn to their neighbours in the hope of going to Heaven. Has Mr Bhujoharry been helping the poor all the time in the hope of finding a place in Council?

“Alas! for the rarity
Of Christian charity
Under the sun!”

Had the members of the Parti Mauricien stopped at debasing charity or generosity, people would have said they are bad Christians or bad Moslems. But as they went further and exposed their utter lack of tact and humour, we cannot help calling them awful politicians.

All hell was let loose at Plaine Verte just because it happened that there were a few hecklers in the crowd. For its next meeting, the Parti Mauricien may add this to its posters: Gag the hecklers!

In spite of the fact that the meeting was held just in front of the Plaine Verte Police Station, the help of the Police was invoked with the urgency of a S.O.S. from a ship in distress. Those who had been so earnestly invited to attend the meeting felt suddenly like breathing the air of a concentration camp.

But the limit was really reached when Hon Mohamed appealed to his frères. That Hon Mohamed should have supporters is quite natural. But that Hon Mohamed should ask his supporters to silence his opponents by any means is really shocking. We are far from being in a fascist state. Hon Mohamed should realize how dangerous it is to talk the language he talked.

And Hon Mohamed referred to his philanthropy. He quoted shamelessly an instance to generalize that Hindus were ungrateful. In the name of those Hon Mohamed has helped privately, we say:

Take these again; for to the noble mind
Rich gifts wax poor when givers prove unkind.

 * * *

So Long, Mr N.M.U!

N.M.U. has left us. He has taken care to tell us that it’s just a holiday of three months to be spent in the land of his ancestors. He must be tired, the old man, for it is not the time for a militant journalist to be holidaying. But is he? We cannot help thinking that the old man has something up his sleeve.

How can we fancy N.M.U. fiddling in Paris while Port Louis is burning? He has told us in his article “Je me déporte” some for the things he will be doing. It’s all so innocent. Relaxing on the spacious banks of the Seine or strolling in the shade of the trees of Bois de Boulogne or just sipping a blonde – read beer – on the Parisian Boulevards – that is how N.M.U. wants us to picture him abroad.

N.M.U. will not be alone in enjoying the holiday he has in mind. Air France has taken other holiday-makers to Europe before him and others are going to follow suit. Holiday apart, it will be quite a conference.

We are thankful to N.M.U. for having thought of us while leaving the colony. We are afraid that Mauritius will miss him. His absence will not only be felt in Mallefille Street but also elsewhere and at Mauritius Times. But N.M.U. should be careful to be back in time, otherwise we shall have learnt to do without him.

We are not concerned with what N.M.U. will be doing on the continent: let him attend the wedding of Prince Rainier of Monaco if he can or propound his theory on colonial policy at Quai d’Orsay, if he likes. We shall watch him elsewhere because we have an uncanny feeling that he is going to pull wires along with others in London. He must be emboldened now to misrepresent facts being given that His Excellency the Governor has given him so much prominence.

N.M.U. has told us that he is going to meet Mr Swingler, M.P., to open his eyes. Once the eyes are open, we hope N.M.U. won’t throw dust into them. And he is going surely to meet Sir Hilary Blood to thank him most warmly for the keen interest he is taking in Mauritian affairs. Will N.M.U. tell Sir Hilary how foolish and futile it is to try to rule Mauritius by proxy?

It is a thousand pities that N.M.U. will not find time to meet Peter Ibbotson and James Johnson. And why should he meet them? He has made up his mind not to hear the other man. Hasn’t he told us that it is now useless to discuss the constitutional proposals? All he wants is to see the Colonial Office foisting what it wants – and what he wants – on us.

 

 

  • Published in print edition on 1 November 2017

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